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posted 2 days ago
Cave Creek Museum

Things are coming together at the Museum! So many exciting new exhibits for 21-22 Season. This exhibit recognizes a celebrated local author and naturalist! ... See MoreSee Less

Things are coming together at the Museum!  So many exciting new exhibits for 21-22 Season.  This exhibit recognizes a celebrated local author and naturalist!

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I thought it might be “guy in hat and t-shirt.”

Tom & Joe!!!! Xoxoxo

Is that Tom Wright?

posted 3 days ago
Cave Creek Museum

Today's the day! Taco Tuesday and celebrating another iconic Local Landmark. See you there! ... See MoreSee Less

Todays the day!  Taco Tuesday and celebrating another iconic Local Landmark.  See you there!

Comment on Facebook

How many remember when Marie and Serge had the little French Cafe there -authentic French food (with a bit of southwest). The best home made ice cream! 🍨

posted 3 days ago
Cave Creek Museum

It's THANK YOU TUESDAY!!! And who do we have to thank for making us the COOLEST museum in Cave Creek? Desert State Air LLC. Two weeks ago our main air conditioning unit went down, and Desert State Air recognized how important climate control is to safeguard our priceless collections--especially in the summer heat. In the span of a couple days they had us diagnosed--unfortunately the unit had aged out--quoted us a very fair price, and had the new unit installed by a team of super nice guys. We believe they give every customer the same great service and attention to detail, so we hope you all will give Desert State Air a call when things get too hot at your house!
#ThankYouTuesday #desertstateair #cavecreekmuseum #cavecreek #cavecreekaz
... See MoreSee Less

Its THANK YOU TUESDAY!!!  And who do we have to thank for making us the COOLEST museum in Cave Creek?  Desert State Air LLC.  Two weeks ago our main air conditioning unit went down, and Desert State Air recognized how important climate control is to safeguard our priceless collections--especially in the summer heat.  In the span of a couple days they had us diagnosed--unfortunately the unit had aged out--quoted us a very fair price, and had the new unit installed by a team of super nice guys.  We believe they give every customer the same great service and attention to detail, so we hope you all will give Desert State Air a call when things get too hot at your house!
#ThankYouTuesday   #desertstateair #cavecreekmuseum #cavecreek #cavecreekaz

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Love to see Chamber Members helping each other out!

posted 4 days ago
Cave Creek Museum

The word Hohokam is a Pima language term for “all used up” or “exhausted,” and the name given by archeologists to the ancient farming peoples of the southern deserts of Arizona.

The Hohokam lived in the Phoenix Basin along the Gila and Salt Rivers, in southern Arizona along the Santa Cruz and San Pedro Rivers, and north on the Lower Verde River and along the New and Agua Fria Rivers. Hohokam influences were even more widespread, with Hohokam-style architecture and artifacts as far north as Flagstaff, Arizona, south into northern Sonora, Mexico, and east into southwestern New Mexico.

Hohokam villages are evidenced in many areas within the Cave Creek Mining District--one that is easy to reach by a short hike is named the "Sears-Kay Ruins" and is located off FR 24 just inside the boundaries of the Tonto National Forest.

The Hohokam were“masters of the desert.” The pre-history people lived in and around Cave Creek from about 700 A.D. through 1450 A.D.During this time, they achieved remarkable successes. The Hohokam are probably most famous for their creation of extensive irrigation canals along the Salt and Gila rivers. In fact, the Hohokam had the largest and most complex irrigation systems of any culture in the New World. When the Arizona canals were built to supply Phoenix and outlying areas with water, the engineers used the traces of the ancient Hohokam canals to guide them.

Why this once-flourishing cultural pattern came to an end remains a mystery. Whatever the answer, however, people remained, descendants of whom include the Pima and Tohono O'odham of southern Arizona.
... See MoreSee Less

The word Hohokam is a Pima language term for “all used up” or “exhausted,” and the name given by archeologists to the ancient farming peoples of the southern deserts of Arizona.

The Hohokam lived in the Phoenix Basin along the Gila and Salt Rivers, in southern Arizona along the Santa Cruz and San Pedro Rivers, and north on the Lower Verde River and along the New and Agua Fria Rivers. Hohokam influences were even more widespread, with Hohokam-style architecture and artifacts as far north as Flagstaff, Arizona, south into northern Sonora, Mexico, and east into southwestern New Mexico.

Hohokam villages are evidenced in many areas within the Cave Creek Mining District--one that is easy to reach by a short hike is named the Sears-Kay Ruins and is located off FR 24 just inside the boundaries of the Tonto National Forest. 

The Hohokam were“masters of the desert.” The pre-history people lived in and around Cave Creek from about 700 A.D. through 1450 A.D.During this time, they achieved remarkable successes. The Hohokam are probably most famous for their creation of extensive irrigation canals along the Salt and Gila rivers. In fact, the Hohokam had the largest and most complex irrigation systems of any culture in the New World.  When the Arizona canals were built to supply Phoenix and outlying areas with water, the engineers used the traces of the ancient Hohokam canals to guide them.  

Why this once-flourishing cultural pattern came to an end remains a mystery. Whatever the answer, however, people remained, descendants of whom include the Pima and Tohono Oodham of southern Arizona.

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After the Younger Dryas event, humans drastically canaled the Amazon basin thousands of years years before the Hohokam. www.atlantisbolivia.org/canalorinoccotoamazon.htm

The Cave Creek Museum also houses & displays the artifacts from 5 local excavations: Livingston, Ocotillo, Quarter Circle One, Mueller, and Shogur. Also on display are loans of artifacts from local excavations curated at other institutions: the Blue Wash Ruin, Spur Cross Ranch and a long term loan of fabulous Hohokam pottery from Cactus Shadows Fine Art Center.

posted 7 days ago
Cave Creek Museum

Another celebration at the Historic Church at the Cave Creek Museum. In the five years since we partnered with the Mission Wedding Chapel, hundreds of couples have taken or renewed their vows in the venerable old church.

Do you know lovebirds looking for an authentically rustic wedding venue?

Check out www.themissionchapel.com
... See MoreSee Less

Another celebration at the Historic Church at the Cave Creek Museum.  In the five years since we partnered with the Mission Wedding Chapel, hundreds of couples have taken or renewed their vows in the venerable old church.  

Do you know lovebirds looking for an authentically rustic wedding venue? 

Check out www.themissionchapel.com
posted 1 week ago
Cave Creek Museum

And it's Friday Funny Time!!!

#FridayFunny #cavecreekmuseum #cavecreek #CaveCreekAZ
... See MoreSee Less

And its Friday Funny Time!!!

#FridayFunny #cavecreekmuseum #cavecreek #CaveCreekAZ
posted 1 week ago
Cave Creek Museum

It's THANK YOU TUESDAY! And the Cave Creek Museum sends a BIG thank you to our friends and business partners, Tech4Life. Tech4Life has been a friend indeed to many located in the Cave Creek/Carefree area and in particular to the many non-profits. The giving of their time and knowledge knows no bounds and we appreciate them. We hope you'll remember Tech4Life for all your tech needs!

#thankyoutuesday #thankyou #tech4life #cavecreekmuseum #cavecreek #CaveCreekAZ
... See MoreSee Less

Its THANK YOU TUESDAY!  And the Cave Creek Museum sends a BIG thank you to our friends and business partners, Tech4Life.  Tech4Life has been a friend indeed to many located in the Cave Creek/Carefree area and in particular to the many non-profits.  The giving of their time and knowledge knows no bounds and we appreciate them.  We hope youll remember Tech4Life for all your tech needs! 

 #thankyoutuesday #thankyou #tech4life #cavecreekmuseum #cavecreek #CaveCreekAZ
posted 2 weeks ago
Cave Creek Museum

Dorothy Smith, (pictured), a retired librarian from New York, had grown up in East Coast refinement, she loved Cave Creek and saw a need for a library to serve the rural area. Determined to serve the public, Mrs. Smith filled the trunk of her car with books and bounced around the rutted dirt roads of Cave Creek to lend books to the townsfolk. In 1954, Mrs. Smith’s friend, Corolyn Cox, signed a contract with Maricopa County to open the Cave Creek Branch of the Maricopa Library. For over a decade, the library moved to different locations as it grew, before finally moving into its own building in 1969. It was named the Dorothy E. Smith Maricopa County Free Library in its founder’s honor. When the library moved into its current home on Saguaro Hill, it was renamed Desert Foothills Library. #cavecreekmuseum #cavecreek #cavecreekhistory #desertfoothillslibrary ... See MoreSee Less

Dorothy Smith, (pictured), a retired librarian from New York, had grown up in East Coast refinement, she loved Cave Creek and saw a need for a library to serve the rural area.  Determined to serve the public, Mrs. Smith filled the trunk of her car with books and bounced around the rutted dirt roads of Cave Creek to lend books to the townsfolk.  In 1954, Mrs. Smith’s friend, Corolyn Cox, signed a contract with Maricopa County to open the Cave Creek Branch of the Maricopa Library.  For over a decade, the library moved to different locations as it grew, before finally moving into its own building in 1969.  It was named the Dorothy E. Smith Maricopa County Free Library in its founder’s honor.  When the library moved into its current home on Saguaro Hill, it was renamed Desert Foothills Library. #cavecreekmuseum #cavecreek #cavecreekhistory #desertfoothillslibrary

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A woman after my heart

A true pioneer of public service! Imagine if today's most vocal public leaders were like Dorothy Smith... 🇺🇲

What a wonderful history of the library. It is too bad they changed the name as this great lady deserved the recognition.

Great story, thank you for sharing

They should really consider changing the name back to The Dorothy E. Smith Library.

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posted 2 weeks ago
Cave Creek Museum

"Fun fact:10,000 years ago this was a lake."
#FridayFunny #cavecreekmuseum #cavecreek #cavecreekaz
... See MoreSee Less

Fun fact:10,000 years ago this was a lake.
#FridayFunny #cavecreekmuseum #cavecreek #cavecreekaz

Comment on Facebook

Yosemite Sam would be blowin his top about now !!

posted 2 weeks ago
Cave Creek Museum

President Reagan “broke the all-male tradition” on this day in 1981 when he nominated Sandra Day O’Connor to the Supreme Court. O’Connor, an Arizona role model and trailblazer, was sworn in as the first female Supreme Court Justice that September. ... See MoreSee Less

President Reagan “broke the all-male tradition” on this day in 1981 when he nominated Sandra Day O’Connor to the Supreme Court. O’Connor, an Arizona role model and trailblazer, was sworn in as the first female Supreme Court Justice that September.

Comment on Facebook

I was there When my boss Senator Barry Goldwater nominated his life long friend!

posted 2 weeks ago
Cave Creek Museum

Everyone needs to have a goal to battle the inertia of "heat brain". (A common malady during Cave Creek summers!) The Cave Creek Museum's goal for July is to learn to pronounce Phainopepla. Or rather, "The Bird Formerly Known as the Black Cardinal".

First, we have to point out that the Phainopepla is NOT a cardinal, though it looks very similar to the more familiar bird of scarlet plumage with it's perky crested head and glossy feathers, only clad in formal black. The Phainopeplas are the only U.S. representative of the family Ptilogonatidae, (next month's pronunciation goal), known as “silky-flycatchers.”

The Phainopepla's digestive tract is uniquely designed to digest mistletoe berries, but mistletoe berries don't have a lot of nutrients, so a Phainopepla may eat up to 1,100 berries a day! And fun fact: on average, the berries only remain in the Phainopeplas' intestine for about twelve minutes.

The Phainopepla mimics many other bird's calls, but it's own song is a many-syllabled rambling song that includes a distinctive whistled wheedle-ah, given throughout the day from regular song perches.

And how do you pronounce Phainopepla?
fay-no-PEHP-lah... All together now: fay-no-PEHP-lah!

Great Job!!!!

#cavecreekmuseum #cavecreek #cavecreekhistory #cavecreekfauna
... See MoreSee Less

Everyone needs to have a goal to battle the inertia of heat brain.  (A common malady during Cave Creek summers!)  The Cave Creek Museums goal for July is to learn to pronounce Phainopepla.  Or rather, The Bird Formerly Known as the Black Cardinal.

First, we have to point out that the Phainopepla is NOT a cardinal, though it looks very similar to the more familiar bird of scarlet plumage with its perky crested head and glossy feathers, only clad in formal black.  The Phainopeplas are the only U.S. representative of the family Ptilogonatidae, (next months pronunciation goal), known as “silky-flycatchers.”   

The Phainopeplas digestive tract is uniquely designed to digest mistletoe berries, but mistletoe berries dont have a lot of nutrients, so a Phainopepla may eat up to 1,100 berries a day!  And fun fact: on average, the berries only remain in the Phainopeplas intestine for about twelve minutes.

The Phainopepla mimics many other birds calls, but its own song is a many-syllabled rambling song that includes a distinctive whistled wheedle-ah, given throughout the day from regular song perches.

And how do you pronounce Phainopepla?  
fay-no-PEHP-lah...  All together now: fay-no-PEHP-lah!

Great Job!!!!  

#cavecreekmuseum #cavecreek #cavecreekhistory #cavecreekfauna

Comment on Facebook

What a pretty Black Cardinal!

Love these guys.

Please discuss the mistletoe damage two trees

this is begging to be a question at tonight's trivia game at The Grotto Cafe... Thursday, July 8th, first question at 6:30pm...

As much as I enjoy these I don't appreciate them spreading the mistletoe seeds from tree to tree. Dilemma.

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posted 3 weeks ago
Cave Creek Museum

We couldn’t be luckier to be living in this beautiful nation of America. Happy Fourth everyone! ... See MoreSee Less

posted 3 weeks ago
Cave Creek Museum

We know where all the bodies are buried. Because we know Cave Creek history. #cavecreekmuseum #cavecreek #FridayFunny ... See MoreSee Less

We know where all the bodies are buried.  Because we know Cave Creek history.  #cavecreekmuseum #cavecreek #FridayFunny

Comment on Facebook

That is a scary sight!

I guess we should have said "where the bodies AREN'T buried". Exhume me!

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