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19 hours ago

Cave Creek Museum

The life of a female on the frontier was rugged and required women as well as their daughters to wear durable clothing.

During the days of the frontier, women and girls often wore dresses made of calico, an inexpensive cotton fabric. Wool and lenin were also common materials, with women and girls typically making their own dresses.

Short dresses were popular on the frontier, which consisted of dresses having short lengths, high necklines, short sleeves, and a petticoat worn underneath. Aprons were often worn to protect clothing from the daily labor of living on the frontier. Bonnets were useful to keep women shielded from the hot sun. Leather boots with buttons or laces were made durable for the hard labor.

Despite the hard days of work, many women and girls had their "Sunday best" dresses of choice. Pictured is Martha Houck, a member of the sheep herding Houck family, at a party in 1905 in a stylish party dress.

Sources:
Shelby County Historical Society.
www.shelbycountyhistory.org/schs/pioneers/clothingpioneer.htm

Job Carr Museum.
www.jobcarrmuseum.org/blog/women-s-work-creating-clothing-on-the-frontier

www.cavecreekmuseum.org
... See MoreSee Less

The life of a female on the frontier was rugged and required women as well as their daughters to wear durable clothing. 

During the days of the frontier, women and girls often wore dresses made of calico, an inexpensive cotton fabric. Wool and lenin were also common materials, with women and girls typically making their own dresses. 

Short dresses were popular on the frontier, which consisted of dresses having short lengths, high necklines, short sleeves, and a petticoat worn underneath. Aprons were often worn to protect clothing from the daily labor of living on the frontier. Bonnets were useful to keep women shielded from the hot sun. Leather boots with buttons or laces were made durable for the hard labor.

Despite the hard days of work, many women and girls had their Sunday best dresses of choice. Pictured is Martha Houck, a member of the sheep herding Houck family, at a party in 1905 in a stylish party dress.

Sources: 
Shelby County Historical Society.
https://www.shelbycountyhistory.org/schs/pioneers/clothingpioneer.htm

Job Carr Museum.
https://www.jobcarrmuseum.org/blog/women-s-work-creating-clothing-on-the-frontier

www.cavecreekmuseum.org

Comment on Facebook

Interesting !

Dresses made of "lenin" would have been uncomfortable, to say the least. (He was a Russian revolutionary, politician, and political theorist). I think you meant the fabric linen.

The Cave Creek Museum is proud to have Eye Care North  as our Community Partner for January.   Check out their Cave Creek line of Eyewear!
https://www.eyecarenorth.com/cave-creek-eyewear.html

#cavecreekeyewear #eyecarenorth #arizona #cavecreekmuseum #cavecreekmuseumaz #museum #communitypartner #buylocalorbyebyelocal #buylocal #shoplocal

4 days ago

Cave Creek Museum

Cave Creek Museum is saddened by the loss of Beverly Brooks, a dedicated volunteer and lifetime member of Cave Creek Museum.

Beverly was a member of the Cave Creek Mother’s Club, becoming a pivotal pioneer to the creation of many nonprofits in town, including Cave Creek Museum.

Beverly was known for for her amazing stories of Cave Creek History, and she knew many of Cave Creek’s infamous figures herself. Mrs. Brooks could often be found telling her stories of Cave Creek to guests, leaving them with a deep appreciation of the town’s history she dedicated her life to.

Beverly Brooks will be deeply missed by staff, Board, volunteers, family, and friends.

Mrs. Brooks’ obituary can be found here:
www.legacy.com/obituaries/azcentral/obituary.aspx?n=beverly-metcalfe-brooks&pid=197459834&fhid=2645
... See MoreSee Less

Cave Creek Museum is saddened by the loss of Beverly Brooks, a dedicated volunteer and lifetime member of Cave Creek Museum. 

Beverly was a member of the Cave Creek Mother’s Club, becoming a pivotal pioneer to the creation of many nonprofits in town, including Cave Creek Museum.

Beverly was known for for her amazing stories of Cave Creek History, and she knew many of Cave Creek’s infamous figures herself. Mrs. Brooks could often be found telling her stories of Cave Creek to guests, leaving them with a deep appreciation of the town’s history she dedicated her life to. 

Beverly Brooks will be deeply missed by staff, Board, volunteers, family, and friends.  

Mrs. Brooks’ obituary can be found here:
https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/azcentral/obituary.aspx?n=beverly-metcalfe-brooks&pid=197459834&fhid=2645

Comment on Facebook

Prayer's 🙏🌹✝️

🙏

I'm sorry for the loss of Beverly. Looks like Cave Creek lost another good soul.

Beverly was a wonderful lady, with amazing stories! I will miss seeing her at The Toad and talking with her.

One of a kind💝

We met her at the museum several years ago and her stories of ranching life - crow-hopping horses and snakes, for example - have stayed with us ever since.

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5 days ago

Cave Creek Museum

We want to thank everyone who came out yesterday to our Kiwanis Family Sunday Event. It was a huge success and we can't thank the Phoenix Herpetological Sanctuary for coming out to educate us on Safety in the Sonoran Desert. We absolutely loved getting an up close look at some of our Desert Dwellers! ... See MoreSee Less

5 days ago

Cave Creek Museum

Did you know that Cave Creek used to have a one room schoolhouse?

One room schoolhouses were popular in the 19th and 20th centuries in the American West. Typically, one teacher would be in charge of children of many ages. Children would learn about history, geography, arithmetic's, reading, and writing. During the winter months, the teacher would arrive early to heat up the schoolhouse by lighting a fire in the potbelly stove if one was in the schoolhouse.

Cave Creek's first one room schoolhouse opened in 1886. Pictured is Susie A. Corpstein, a teacher of the school house from 1901 to 1903.

Sources:
Frances C. Carlson. Cave Creek and Carefree, Arizona. A History in the Desert Foothills. Scottsdale, Arizona: Encanto Press, 1996.

Heritage Alliance.
www.heritageall.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Americas-One-Room-Schools-of-the-1890s.pdf

www.cavecreekmuseum.org
... See MoreSee Less

Did you know that Cave Creek used to have a one room schoolhouse? 

One room schoolhouses were popular in the 19th and 20th centuries in the American West. Typically, one teacher would be in charge of children of many ages. Children would learn about history, geography, arithmetics, reading, and writing. During the winter months, the teacher would arrive early to heat up the schoolhouse by lighting a fire in the potbelly stove if one was in the schoolhouse.

Cave Creeks first one room schoolhouse opened in 1886. Pictured is Susie A. Corpstein, a teacher of the school house from 1901 to 1903. 

Sources: 
Frances C. Carlson. Cave Creek and Carefree, Arizona. A History in the Desert Foothills. Scottsdale, Arizona: Encanto Press, 1996.

Heritage Alliance.
http://www.heritageall.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Americas-One-Room-Schools-of-the-1890s.pdf 

www.cavecreekmuseum.org
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