Artifact of the month

 

2016-11-artifactNovember 2016 – Prehistoric Sandal and Lasts – The sandal shown as artifact of the month is the prehistoric equivalent of a cheap flip-flop —for a minimal investment, you get footwear that lasts for a decent amount of time, and that you throw away afterward. To make one, all you need is… Continue Reading…

 

 


 

2016-10-photoOctober 2016 – Ballot Box – As a nod to the national, state and local elections presently holding us all in their grips, we chose as our October Artifact of the Month this Ballot Box.  It is from our Historic Collections.  We do not know its provenance—as often happened in the early days of the Museum, sometimes during the dark of night, mysterious boxes of this and that would appear at the door of the Museum when folks cleaned out their homes. Continue Reading…

 

 


glm-spursMay 2016A Cowboy and His Spurs – Believe it or not, the first evidence of spurs appeared in about 5th Century B.C., and in the oddly serendipitous way these things happen, appeared in the Roman Empire, Greece, the medieval Arabic world and amongst the Celts all at about the same time!  These early spurs were “prick” spurs—long points welded onto a metal or leather yoke.  Prick spurs were common until the 14th century, when rowel spurs made their appearance.  Continue Reading…

 


 

pyramidApril 2016Pyramid

 

 

 

 

 


ho-figure-3 March 2016Small Pottery Sherd – a broken piece of pottery about the size of a quarter that has part of a human figure painted on it. It was made by the people we call Hohokam. The Cave Creek Museum has some modern reproduction pots showing how these figures would look when complete.  Continue Reading…

 

 


 

feb-photo-1February 2016Crazy Quilt – The Museum’s Crazy Quilt was donated by volunteer Ann Gorton. This crazy quilt, whose provenance is not completely known, is thought to date back to the 1870s and may have been created by a member of the Ann’s family or, as Ann admits, it may have been purchased.  Continue Reading…

 

 

 


jan-aom-snipJanuary 2016Salt Bowl – This simple bowl represents the best of Hohokam culture near the end of more than 1,000 years of pottery making. It’s identified as the Salt Red type, Salt variety, A. D. 1300 – 1450.  Archaeologist J. Scott Wood said Salt Red is “the culmination of the Hohokam Redware tradition.”  Continue Reading…

 

 

 


 

aom-december2015-photoDecember 2015

 

 

 

 

 


aom-november-2015-photo-2November 2015Button, Button – A campaign button is a pin used during an election as political advertising for (or against) a candidate or political party, or to proclaim the issues that are part of the political platform. Political buttons date as far back as President George Washington. Buttons have been an important part of American politics since day one. Would it surprise you to learn that George Washington wore a campaign button? It’s true. Almost every American President had campaign buttons of some sort, from George Washington to most recently Barack Obama. Continue Reading…

 


oct2015October 2015Obliterated corrugated – This sturdy pottery jug is made in the style identified as “obliterated corrugated,” which refers to the exterior texture almost certainly crafted by using coil construction. Remember grade school art classes when you rolled out “worms” of clay then wound them around to create an object?  Continue Reading…

 

 


 

May 2015 AoMMay 2015Katsinas – In the Hopi religion, Katsinas are supernatural beings that are kindly spirits of life, fertility and prosperity.  They are intermediaries to the gods, who come to villages and dance and ask the gods for bountiful crops, rain, and peaceful lives.  At three main Hopi Katsina ceremonies—December, February, and in July—dancers don elaborate painted and carved costumes to impersonate these benevolent spirits.  Continue Reading…

 

 


 


20150320_120229April 2015
Fan-cy That! – Hand fans first appeared in Europe in the 12th century and became popular in the 16th, carried by both ladies and gentlemen.  They remained popular into the twentieth century, even becoming popular advertising giveaways, but like gloves and hats and other article of civility, they were cast aside during the maelstrom of social change in the late 60’s and early 70’s.   Continue Reading…

 


 

March AoM 4March 2015 – Arrowhead vs. Projectile Point? – “What’s the difference between an arrowhead versus a projectile point?”  That’s a pretty common question heard in the Archaeology Wing of the Cave Creek Museum.  What regular people call arrowheads, archaeologists typically call “projectile points”, not   because it sounds more academic, but because stone, wood, bone, antler, copper and other raw material types were used to put sharp points on the ends of all kinds of projectiles, not just arrows. Continue Reading…

 

 


 

Feb AoM 1February 2015 – The Sweet Family Collection – The Sweet Family only resided in Cave Creek from 1945 through 1949, but in those four years, George Sr and his wife Mary, daughter, Lyn and son George Jr., better known as Skipper, became an integral part of the dusty little town built beside the creek.  Continue Reading…

 

 


 

AOM Jan 2015 V2January 2015 – Prehistoric Native American “Mini-Pots” – The Cave Creek Museum is proud to house and exhibit an extensive collection of prehistoric pottery, much of it collected from local and regional sites, at first by interested parties as they immigrated into the area; later by professional archaeologists. Some of the most intriguing pottery pieces are the “miniatures”.   Continue Reading…

 

 


 

December 2014 AOMDecember 2014 – The Cave Creek Christmas Pageant – The Cave Creek Christmas Pageant was the brainchild of Jean Hagler, 4-H leader on a mission to give back to the community.  In 1952, a group of eight girls corralled their brothers and sister and any other children in the community to help with the pageant.  Continue Reading…

 

 


 

November 2014 AoM-photoNovember 2014US Military Residents – Cave Creek Museum is honored to salute our residents of Cave Creek and Carefree who have so proudly served in the US military.  We respect and appreciate the sacrifices all our servicemen and women and their loved ones have made for the United States of America.  Continue Reading…

 

 


 

Oct 2014 AoM-1October 2014 – “Cowboy Isn’t a Style,  It’s a Way of Life” – Look closely at this sweat and dust encrusted hat.  For years, this crowned George Mileham.  At George’s funeral in 1981, hundreds of locals gathered to mourning the passing of one Cave Creek’s “last cowboys”.  This is not the hat of a “dime store cowboy”.  Continue Reading…

 

 


 

AOM May 2014May 2014 – Apache Water Jar – This basket has been waterproofed with pine pitch. It is lightweight and difficult to break – a perfect water vessel for a mobile people like the Apache. Our Artifact of the Month for May 2014 is on loan from the Schoonover family, in memory of Grace Schoonover.  Continue Reading…

 


 

IMG_1827April 2014Mid-century Hats – It’s a very old tradition to celebrate spring by dressing up for Easter.  The new hat or “Easter bonnet” was an important part of the spring costume in the days when hats were more in fashion than they are today. The Cave Creek Museum is featuring mid-20thCentury hats from its collection.  Continue Reading…

 


 

IMG_1722March 2014 – Archaeology Month in Arizona – To celebrate Archaeology Month in Arizona, we selected one of the Museum’s beautiful prehistoric pots for the Artifact of the Month exhibit. The displayed pot is a type called St. John’s Polychrome that was made in northeastern Arizona around 1175 to 1300 A.D. Continue Reading…

 


 

AOM Feb 2014 (1)February 2014Wedding Apparel -February’s artifact features wedding apparel which is only fitting since February is when we celebrate love. Our exhibit includes delicate slippers dating from 1845 plus a wedding veil and pearl accented ring bearer cushion which date from 1942. The amber bridesmaid’s hat is from the 1930s era.  Continue Reading…

 

 


 

Dec2013December 2013 – A story Written by Lara Lloyd – You may have heard of Harper’s Bazaar and Harper’s Weekly, but what about Harper’s Young People? Harper’s Young People was a children’s magazine that was published over 100 years ago.  The first issue was published by Harper & Brothers in 1879.  Continue Reading…

 

 

 


 

April 2013 – Charles Gilbert Sherd Collection – Charles (Charlie) Gilbert left many legacies.  As a biology teacher in Phoenix, he taught many young people to love the Sonoran desert.  As a self-taught master potter, he showed many adults in the Desert Foothills how to make pottery as the Native Americans did, collecting clay from the environment, and firing pots in open fires.  Continue Reading…


 

AOM Mar 13March 2013White Mountain Redwares – This unusual pitcher with a dog effigy or figurine for a handle is called a St. John’s Polychrome, manufactured around A.D. 1150 to 1300.  It’s one of the White Mountain Redwares, originating from the White Mountains and upper Little Colorado watershed.  The Cave Creek Museum is fortunate to have numerous examples of White Mountain Redwares.  Continue Reading…

 

 


 

AOM Feb 13February 2013Cast Iron Toy Locomotive – February’s artifact is a cast iron toy locomotive found at the Ocotillo Road site in Cave Creek.  The property is now a private residence. When the archaeologists began working there in 1989, it was vacant except for stone foundations and wall fragments of several historic structures. Excavations unearthed many historic artifacts.  Continue Reading…

 

Physical Address
6140 E Skyline Drive
Cave Creek AZ 85327 (Map)
Phone: (480) 488-2764

Mailing Address
PO Box 1
Cave Creek AZ 85327

Hours
Open October through May:
Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday, Sunday - 1:00pm - 4:30pm
Friday - 10:00am - 4:30pm
Monday - CLOSED
Tuesday - CLOSED